Our Expertise

Our Expertise

Call Termination

Ross Patterson led the Commerce Commission’s investigation into whether the mobile termination access services should be regulated The investigation identified the relevant markets, assessed the state of competition in those markets, and considered whether, having regard to the state of competition, regulation of mobile termination access services was likely to promote competition for the long-term benefit of end users. The costs and benefits of regulation were examined, by comparing the situation in the absence of regulation (the counterfactual) with the situation if regulation was imposed (the factual).The Commission ultimately recommended to the Minister that MTAS be subject to regulation. That advice was accepted, and the Commission subsequently determined the price and non-price terms of mobile termination.

Stewart White was Group Public Policy Director at Vodafone responsible for group and operational responses regarding call termination issues during 1999-2005.

During Andy Haire’s role as Singapore Telecom’s regulator, he oversaw the policy shifts associated with implementing an economically sound mobile termination rates (MTR) policy, and later, while serving as eircom’s (the Irish incumbent) head of external affairs negotiated and implemented the various EU MTR directives.

Carrier Services Transformation and Enhancement

Paul Ryan is leading a team advising a listed diversified group of mobile operations on the transformation of its carrier services business and identifying and closing down illegal bypass activities by third parties harming its businesses. The team includes Eileen Maher, Tom Hogarty and Patrick Crowley. The outcome of this work has been considerable savings and enhancement of the profitability of the group companies.

Competition issues including on-net/off-net price discrimination, margin squeeze and other behaviour relating to dominance and market power

Ross Patterson led two investigations into whether the New Zealand incumbent operator had breached its obligations of non-discrimination under its Operational Separation Undertakings in relation to firstly the offer of loyalty discounts to ISPs, and secondly in providing a sub-loop extension service to its retail business which was not available to ISPs.

The process involved extensive examination of internal documentation and emails, the preparation of a draft Investigation Report which was provided to the incumbent for comment, and an assessment of the harm to competition caused by the conduct in question.

In the market review into whether the mobile termination access services should be regulated, (see section on mobile termination)  a major issue considered was whether the volume of on-net traffic (in excess of 90%), and the significant price differential between on-net and off-net calls and texts, created a barrier to expansion by a late market entrant.

Stewart White has extensive competition/anti-trust experience in many jurisdictions and was intimately involved with the change in the dominance test in EU as part of the 1999 Regulatory Review and in many market reviews conducted for operators or for regulators. This included SMP designations and remedies. Similarly he has advised Etisalat on its 3rd mobile licence including SMP requirements and also was an advisor to Etisalat on the TRAs market review in 2011.

In addition, the undertakings given by Vodafone in the Mannesmann transaction approval process to the EU included specific undertakings about ‘margin squeeze’, non-discrimination, fast track arbitration and the like. At Vodafone he was also involved in a number of regulatory issues around on net and off net pricing. Part of the role of the regulator is to review competition impacts of competition actions taken by market players.  As such, he led the analysis, and make decisions associated with numerous consolidations, with some of the worlds largest market participants.  Reviews and enforcement activity covering hundreds of cases included most economic concerns facing a sector regulator: market power from concentrations, price squeeze, predation, cross-subsidization, definition and abuse of dominant position.

Andy Haire had many years of experience as a competition lawyer he was regularly called upon to assess the market power of market participants, when advising clients who were dealing with claims from the regulatory that they possessed market power, or in preparing claims on behalf of clients facing what was alleged to be a misuse of market power by a competitor. The market reviews include a consideration of remedies where market power was found to exist, and a recommendation of the remedy which was assessed as being best able to promote competition for the long term benefit of end users.

Bob Horton, has provided advice on these matters through the ITU at a global level, and with individual countries in the Asia Pacific Region.

Paul Ryan has not only been involved in the writing of the framework and setting the appropriate standards to be met when regulating, he has also been involved in representing mobile and fixed operators during the technical regulatory market analysis processes. Paul represented each Vodafone operating company in Europe and associated Vodafone Companies (such as Proximus and Polkomtel) in the process. Findings of dominance or collective dominance were proposed on many occasions. The vast majority were quashed. By way of statistical example, by 2009, 41 findings of potential joint dominance were considered by European regulators. Only 6 were confirmed as positive and only 4 of these approved by the European Commission, at least one of these did not force remedies and the Irish case was successfully challenged in court and overruled.

Consumer Regulation

Stewart White At Vodafone had general regulatory oversight of Group positions regarding consumer protection across all Operating Companies.

As part of the work with ictQATAR currently underway, the redrafting and adoption of new QoS and consumer protection policies.

Stewart also worked on the preparation of a discussion paper with an operator in the region which included detailed review of the existing consumer regulations in the UAE.

Paul Ryan was responsible for Vodafone’s consumer protection policy including billing, transparency, data security, data protection, e-billing, VAS, premium rate services, tariffing and other matters.

Ernie Newman has fifteen years at a senior level, globally and nationally, in the promotion and implementation of telecommunications regulation. My work has focused especially on safeguarding consumers from the adverse effects of substantial market power in a network industry environment, and ensuring that the practical experience of consumers in the market is factored into the regulatory and legislative decisions. In particular my twelve years at a senior level in the International Telecommunications Users Group, part of that as Chairman, has given me a global perspective of the issues important to residential and business users of telecommunications across 25 countries.

Design and implementation of corporate governance structures, and regulatory and strategic risk management

Ross Patterson was the founder of SAFETRAC, a market leader in online compliance training, providing a wide range of legal compliance, policy compliance, and risk management training and testing products.

Stewart White has extensive experience as a company director, and in the design of corporate governance and risk management programmes. He was a member of Vodafone’s Group Policy Committee, one of the then three sub-committees of the main Board, and a director of a number of subsidiaries, listed and unlisted, including Vodafone Pacific and Vodafone Greece. He was also a director of Etisalat’s Nigerian subsidiary in 2010.

Stewart worked with Group General Counsel of Telecom NZ Ltd. and assisted on a drive between 2008-2013 to repair significant historical damage to Telecom’s reputation and relationships with the government and key stakeholders. This was to kick start “constructive engagement” between government, regulators, affected industry and consumers and resulted in a number of actions following a detailed workshop on the key issues. This resulted in a raft of significant changes to the regulatory regime and selection as the government’s preferred partner for a national FTTH rollout.

Paul Ryan was responsible for oversight of regulatory and political affairs across Vodafone’s European footprint including all EU markets, Turkey, Albania and Egypt, including competition policy and anti-trust issues, created and managed a governance structure for all markets, including best practice sharing and articulated Vodafone’s position in dialogue with European Union institutions, other international and national regulatory authorities. He has extensive understanding of telecommunications regulatory economics, having deployed (for operators, regulators and policy makers) economic argument in debates on proposed regulation over 20 years.

Design and implementation of Universal Service (including broadband) Obligations

As NZ Telecommunications Commissioner, Ross Patterson oversaw the annual determination of the cost of the universal service obligation, and the allocation of those costs among operators, and the issue of a discussion paper on the scope the Telecommunications Development Levy (TDL), introduced in 2011, which extended the levy obligation from local access and calling services to all telecommunications services.

Stewart White has advised operators and governments about universal service obligations and the creation of universal service funds. Most recently these issues have come up in the context of NBN in Australia, for example.

Design and review of regulatory regimes including market reviews

Akhet advised ictQATAR on a regulatory capability assessment and overall regulatory strategic plan for 2012-15, including the drafting of a public consultation document on these objectives.

Ross Patterson led the Commerce Commission’s market review into whether the mobile termination access services should be regulated (see section on mobile termination).

In October 2009, Ross led the Commission’s review into whether changes should be made to the regulated resale services that had been introduced in 2001.

The investigation identified the relevant markets, assessed the state of competition, compared the counterfactual with the factual, and assessed the costs and benefits of maintaining or removing resale regulation. The process encompassed the issue of a draft report, submissions and cross submissions, and a hearing, before a final report was issued.

Ross also led a number of other competition and market reviews in relation to backhaul and bitstream services.

Stewart White has many years experience in the design or review of regulatory regimes across many jurisdictions, including the Czech Republic, Oman, Jordan and Palestine. At Vodafone he was responsible for the Group’s Public Policy worldwide and this included its policy, regulatory and strategic development of positions advocated and negotiated with Governments (including ITU), Regulators, Industry bodies and other stakeholders.

He led the Group’s efforts with regard to the EU’s 1999 Regulatory Review which resulted in a more competition-based regime for telecom regulation Europe and worked closely with the European Commission in these efforts as well as key governments and NRAs, such as the UK, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, Sweden, Spain and Ireland.. He was also responsible for many market reviews in the Vodafone operations and subsequently for other clients. He advised a number of clients in EU on market access conditions under the subsequent 2009 EU Regulatory package.

All of this work has included carrying out market and competition reviews, assessing market power and the cost and benefit of regulatory intervention, and designing remedies where appropriate. It has also including drafting primary or secondary legislation as well as licences and amendments to same.

Andy Haire was the architect of, and defined and implemented, the liberalisation and competition framework for Singapore, and created the organization that regulated the sector. He further defined sectoral competition principles that resulted in one of the most vibrant telecom markets in the world.  Variations of this model have been copied worldwide.  In addition he directed the review of the costs associated with advancing liberalization timetables, which resulted in a determination of compensation for the impacted stakeholders.

Development and implementation of licensing regimes

Stewart White was a lead advisor on the creation of the regulatory regimes in Jordan, Palestine and Oman, which included drafting the necessary laws and licences. He advised an EU NRA on the structure and award of a 2nd mobile licence. As a lead adviser to Etisalat on the 3rd mobile licence in Egypt, he led the negotiations with the NTRA on the licence, which included appropriate market remedies, such as SMP. He recently reviewed unified licensing issues with regard to two countries in the Middle East.

Andy Haire has advised regulators, governments, and operators throughout Asia, North America and Europe since the early 1980s on the key points of crafting legislation and regulations properly and effectively to insure the proper policy outcome. In Singapore, not only was the architect of the entire licensing regime (infrastructure, service based and radio spectrum – and eventually the national broadband project) he spend years refining the framework to maximize its yield to all relevant stakeholders (consumers, providers, equipment suppliers, and Singapore’s government). The work he managed and directed starting over a decade ago has provided access to networks, and has made Singapore one of the most connected and economically efficient markets in the world.

Bob Horton has been involved in all aspect of licence categories and awards in telecommunications and radio communications and broadcasting as a practising regulator. Also, has been in the position of providing advice on these matters through the ITU at a global level, and with individual countries in the Asia Pacific Region.

Expert advice to bodies such as the International Telecommunication Union

Akhet is an ITU-D Sector Member.

Stewart White is and has been an adviser to a succession of Secretaries General of the ITU from Richard Butler to the present Secretary General, Dr. Hamadoun Touré.

He has been an active participant in a number of Plenipotentiary Conferences as well as WRCs, Development Conferences as well as the WSIS in Geneva and the preparatory work for Tunis.  This work has involved him in close working relationships with the Development Sector and the Radio Regulations Board as well as ministers, regulators and key stakeholders in evolving regulatory and policy frameworks, particularly for developing and least developed countries, currently with regard to NGN, Digital Dividend, Internet Governance, convergence, IP related issues, IPTV and cybersecurity. He was part of the SAMENA delegation to the WCIT in December 2013 in Dubai.

He has also been an expert to the European Commission on a range of dossiers in the fixed, mobile and satellite sectors.

Bob Horton, experience in telecommunications, radio communications and broadcasting has been as a practicing regulator in all technical, economic and consumer matters. This has been both in Australia and in Papua New Guinea. As a consultant, he had advised industry, Governments and all three sectors of the ITU on regulatory related issues. He has led Australian Delegations to APT Regional Conferences and ITU World Conferences. In the corporate area, he has some 18 years’ experience in research and then corporate strategy within Telecom Australia, prior to joining the regulatory body in Australia.

Fixed-mobile convergence and convergence in broadcasting, internet, triple play and quadruple play

Dr. Ross Patterson has advised on strategic and regulatory issues arising from a proposed National Broadband Network implementation, the impact of the convergence of telecommunications, broadcasting and internet services on regulatory structure, regulatory regimes and business models, the implications of the development of over-the-top services for telecommunications regulation and business models, and demand side strategies for NBN implementations.

FMC has been talked about for more than 15 years and now it is here and affects all in ICT.

Stewart White has advised on these issues in the context of his work at Vodafone Group, at the ITU, for operators and broadcasters. It is relevant as well for fixed and mobile next generation networks and NGN access. He has advised two operators about options regarding development of IPTV offerings.

Andy Haire, led one of industry’s first positions on FMC taking into account the disparate accounting platforms in the industry.  The eventual design of this platform provided robust incentives to all players so that the Singapore sector would grow substantially, without any adverse impact to the end users.

Information Disclosure and Accounting Separation

Ross Patterson oversaw the introduction of accounting separation in New Zealand, including issuing requirements specifying the standards and methodologies to be used  in preparing its regulatory accounts, determining the form and manner in which information was to be disclosed, and publishing Summary and Analysis Reports of that information.

He also oversaw the implementation of fibre services information disclosure requirements that were introduced in 2011, requiring information disclosure by local fibre companies in relation to the costs and characteristics of the fibre network, and relevant services delivered over the network.

Stewart White spearheaded Vodafone Group’s and coordinated mobile industry inputs to the EU’s ‘1999 Review’, which resulted in the EU telecoms sector laws rules adopted in 2002 and further reviewed by the EU 2009 regulatory package. He was directly involved with the EU DG Comp Regulatory Clearance of the acquisition by Vodafone Group  of Mannesmann in Germany, which included Voluntary Undertakings – to adopt accounting separation across the group and also the structural separation of Orange and Vodafone.

IP Interconnection and termination rates

Stewart White has advised on these issues in the context of his work for government and operators in the context of NGN and NGN access. This is important in terms of new business models in the digital world and its impact on existing copper PSTN connections and the overall competitive framework in the telecommunications markets around the world.

Dr Ross Patterson determined the terms for UCLFS, a regulated service introduced in 2011 that enables access to, and interconnection with, the low frequency (300 – 3400 Hz) in the copper local loop network, to allow the delivery of voice service over fibre to the node (FttN) lines where the copper loop remains in place on both sides of the distribution cabinet.

Paul Ryan was responsible for negotiating and managing Vodafone’s wholesale business including acquiring and launching Vodafone’s wholesale NGN.

Local loop and bitstream regulation

Ross Patterson oversaw the introduction of local loop unbundling and unbundled bitstream access in New Zealand, setting the price and non-price terms for the local loop service

In relation to unbundled bitstream access, the price and non-price terms was set for the bitstream access service, either bundled with the incumbent’s voice service (clothed), or without the voice service (naked).

Prices were also determined for a basic (best efforts)  bitstream access service, and for 40kbps, 90 kbps, and 180kbps  bitstream access services incorporating real time Class of Service.

Stewart White has dealt with these issues most recently with regard to NGN and NGNA in Australia, Europe and Middle East.

Andy Haire, architected Singapore’s interconnection framework which included setting of price, accounting separation models, determination of critical support infrastructure. He addressed and solved the complex interconnection issue to merge the three common, but diametrically opposite, settlement models that drive the telecoms market (the fixed networks, the mobile networks, the internet). Prior to that coordinated the liberalization policies scores of economies around the world to insure fair and equivalent access. He Worked at the policy level in the world’s first effort to provided interconnection to an emerging market.

Andy set the price and non-price terms for bitstream access service in Singapore as a regulator, and in Ireland as an operator.

Mobile Money

Stewart White is active in ITU matters and given his work on mobile money and financial inclusion, he was an expert at a regional workshop on mobile money regulation held in Baku in October 2014.

Stewart recently advised a Central Bank in the region on the creation of a regulatory regime to foster a national digital payment system. This connects with his work on m-commerce; e/mGovernment and SMART Cities.

Greg Reeve has been responsible for large at-scale public and private sector systems covering Financial Services, Machine to Machine, Telecommunications, Travel and Criminal Justice. He has worked globally for most of his career with specific experience in Africa, Latin America, North America and Europe. Greg started working with Mobile Payments when he led M-Pesa Globally for Vodafone from 2009-2013.

Greg has been a board member for Milvik (Bima), which provides an end-to-end mobile insurance solution for mobile operators in emerging markets, Circulo Payment, a joint venture between Millicom and Kalixa to develop a payments service provider to operate in Africa and Latin America, and Rswitch, the national payments switch in Rwanda. He also provides advisory services for other fintech businesses.

Lesley–Ann Vaughan is one of the creators of M-PESA as one of the team of five consultants who delivered the M-PESA platform for Vodafone from concept to launched service, working as Product Management lead. She has deep subject matter expertise in MFS initiatives, both telco-led & bank-led and was instrumental in the functional designs & roadmap prioritization behind Safaricom’s API initiatives for the development community, and the design of the supporting business processes and use case thinking. This detailed design effort has formed part of the Vodafone “Generation-2” Platform strategy.

Christopher Blackburn was part of the executive team that launched Vodacom M-Pesa in Tanzania in 2008 and held key role of Managing Executive of Prepaid Distribution building outlets from 70 to over 10,500. Chris has subsequently led the full program for M-Pesa in Albania, from establishment of Regulation, subsequent licensing and finally to go live for Vodafone.

Gareth Pateman played a central role in the technical evolution of Digital Financial Services across Africa, Asia and Latin America since 2007, having led the M-Pesa Technology Centre of Excellence for Vodafone. Gareth later became the Chief Technology and Information Officer for Mobile Financial Services in Millicom.

Whilst at Vodafone, Gareth commissioned and led the design of the second generation M-Pesa technology platform which is now marketed by Huawei. This platform marked a significant shift from the original closed loop design of M-Pesa to an open API-centric system. He has been responsible for a number of mobile platform migrations in Kenya, Rwanda and Tanzania ensuring the safe migration of millions of accounts between systems.

Dylan Lennox was responsible for starting up and running the commercial operations of Vodacom M-Pesa in Tanzania as Managing Executive: New Technologies and later Chief Officer. Tanzania is widely recognized as one of the leading mobile money markets in the world with Vodacom M-Pesa the leader in a highly competitive environment with greater than 6 million monthly active customers. Dylan has significant experience and expertise in starting up and leading telecoms revenue assurance, billing integrity and product development functions in South Africa, Tanzania and Mozambique.

Mobile roaming, co-location, infrastructure sharing and MVNOs

Ross Patterson dealt with issues relating to national mobile roaming, co-location and infrastructure sharing, and MVNOs, during his term as Telecommunications Commissioner.

Stewart White was at Vodafone during the EU’s international mobile roaming inquiry and subsequently, as part of the acquisition of Mannesmann by Vodafone Group, was responsible for the voluntary undertaking with regard to the creation of a pan european One Rate international roaming package.He has advised one industry body with regard to roaming issues within the GCC.

He has also been active in co-location and infrastructure sharing arrangements (passive and active) for a number of operators (including Vodafone Australia) and has also advised regulators on the competitive advantages of such activities if commercial agreements are not made.

He has evaluated a number of potential MVNO opportunities for an operator and also advised the European Commission on MVNOs as a means of increasing service competition.

Andy Haire lead and managed the bilateral review between Malaysia and Singapore leading up to one of the early agreements that would reset mobile roaming rates closer to cost.

Mobile termination

Ross Patterson led the Commerce Commission’s investigation into whether the mobile termination access services should be regulated The investigation identified the relevant markets, assessed the state of competition in those markets, and considered whether, having regard to the state of competition, regulation of mobile termination access services was likely to promote competition for the long-term benefit of end users. The costs and benefits of regulation were examined, by comparing the situation in the absence of regulation (the counterfactual) with the situation if regulation was imposed (the factual).

The Commission ultimately recommended to the Minister that MTAS be subject to regulation. That advice was accepted, and the Commission subsequently determined the price and non-price terms of mobile termination.

Stewart White was Group Public Policy Director at Vodafone responsible for group and operational responses regarding mobile termination issues during 1999-2005.

During Andy Haire’s role as Singapore Telecom’s regulator, he oversaw the policy shifts associated with implementing an economically sound mobile termination rates (MTR) policy, and later, while serving as eircom’s (the Irish incumbent) head of external affairs negotiated and implemented the various EU MTR directives.

National Broadband Network policy design and implementation including functional (operational) and structural separation

Akhet has advised an incumbent operator in a MENA region in relation to the implementation of a National Broadband Network in that country.

Ross Patterson, as New Zealand’s Telecommunications Commissioner between 2007 and 2012, oversaw the implementation of functional separation of Telecom New Zealand in 2008, and structural separation in 2011, as part of the Ultrafast Broadband Initiative.

Stewart White was an advisor to the Australian Government on the creation of their National Broadband Network, and advised Telecom NZ in relation to both functional and structural separation. He also advised British Telecom in relation to their separation undertakings, and was lead partner advising the Privatisation Board of Kuwait on the PP of the Ministry of Communications fixed network and its fibre upgrade as well as wholesale access.

An advisor to the Australian Government on the creation of the NBN he considered the appropriate regulatory regime based on international principles applicable to Australian market conditions and that included NGN Access. He advised BT on their WLA conditions in UK and a European operator regarding the EU. Stewart White worked with Group General Counsel of Telecom NZ Ltd. and assisted on a drive between 2008-2013 to repair significant historical damage to Telecom’s reputation and relationships with the government and key stakeholders. This was to kick start “constructive engagement” between government, regulators, affected industry and consumers and resulted in a number of actions following a detailed workshop on the key issues. This resulted in a raft of significant changes to the regulatory regime and selection as the government’s preferred partner for a national FTTH rollout.

Andy Haire oversaw the policy definition for Singapore’s NextGen Broadband effort. He played a key part in the design, and implementation of what some consider the most successful attempt to implement a next generation network on a successful existing market.

Network neutrality and related issues

Stewart White has advised a GCC entity on net neutrality issues as well as an international carrier as one inappropriate for regulatory intervention. He was part of the SAMENA delegation at the ITU World Conference on International Telecommunications (Dubai 2012) at which the issue was canvassed and not adopted in the context of the revision of the 1988 International Telecommunications Regulations.

Andy Haire, in his role as responsible for managing Singapore’s ICT policy defined the country’s position on “Net Neutrality”, along with many other policy issues relating to the telecom’s and postal sector: computer misuse, cybersecurity, spam, privacy and data protection.

Postal Services

Stewart White was involved in the review of the Postal Law and Regulation in UAE and jointly prepared a discussion paper for a government authority with regards to regulation and development of ‘Emirates Post’. This also included review of existing postal law and regulation in other countries including Oman.

He reviewed strategy paper prepared at KPMG with regard to Postal services within an EU country.

Middle East Operator – Context of shareholder negotiation of mobile consortium discussion with a Middle Postal Services Operator (shareholder) re expansion of business into electronic services business and possible privatization of postal services in the country.

Andy Haire, as Deputy Director-General (Telecoms & Post) in Singapore’s Infocomm Development Authority (iDA Singapore) between 2000 and 2010, designed, and later implemented the competition framework for Singapore. That framework of policy, law and regulation was responsible for the impressive position that Singapore has earned globally.  The effort included developing competition law, fixed and mobile and internet interconnection frameworks, fully liberalizing the cable landing stations, first movers in 3G and 4G use of spectrum, among the most competitive and vibrant ICT markets anywhere.  He later oversaw the implementation of that country’s National Broadband Network. He developed the model that allowed for a substantial injection of government funding to be injected into an existing competitive market. Andy is is a renowned postal and telecommunications expert, who was responsible as regulator in Singapore for the reform of the postal sector and creation of the new regulatory regime for Singapore Post. His very most recent experience includes advising the Government in Mongolia on Postal reform and recently the Ministry of ICT in Qatar, and the Minister directly.

Faisal Ahmed co-wrote the Valuation report on UK Royal Mail and focused on the financial modeling.

Bojan Mati has Strong experience in Analysis of Industry and Market in Telecom and Postal Sector, benchmarking internationally and competition wise for Telecom and Postal services.

He assessed Croatian Telecom market together with Croatian Telecom Regulatory Agency in respect to introduction of Mobile Virtual operators. He worked on individual cross-functional (and international) tasks and projects (Reporting system), Assisted CTO in preparation for Supervisory Board meetings and management Board meetings. Reported to CTO and Board Members. He extensively worked on pricing in Telecom and Postal Sector, for IP services, mobile and fixed services data specific services, and new postal services Analysed KPI’s of different services in Croatian Post, and benchmarked it to international standards He developed KPI model in Croatian Telecom for Fixed Network performance (core still used today) Set-up new accounts base for Croatian Telecom (as a partner company of Croatian Telecom), maintained the base and worked with Croatian telecom on development. Worked on setting-up account base for Croatian Post for new services.

 

Satellite regulation and commercial agreements

Stewart White has advised satellite operators on commercial (procurement contracts, launch services agreements and related insurance) and regulatory issues (orbital positions, spectrum both for satellite and ground components, coordination under ITU rules and “harmful interference” issues), including THURAYA, Solaris Mobile, EUTELSAT, SES ASTRA, PanAmSat and the EU on policy matters, users of satellite services including CNN, Sky News Arabia, Paramount Pictures, Canal +, SONY and many other PAY TV companies;, and media companies on broadcasting issues in many jurisdictions in Australia, PNG, Thailand, UK and EU such us News International, the Packer organisation and the BBC.

Andy Haire developed and implemented the framework that opened up space and sea segment capacity in Singapore, which contributed to the country earning the top spot in landed transmission capacity.  In addition Andy lead the country’s role in managing a major multi-jurisdictional space segment dispute involving many of the major satellite nations in the world.  This involved not only various bodies within the ITU, but further the major space suppliers and providers worldwide.

Spectrum policy including allocation methodology and the “Digital Dividend”

Stewart White has advised on spectrum issues over many years for mobile, fixed links and satellites in Europe, Africa, Middle East, Asia and Australasia for governments and operators in private practice and while at Vodafone. He was part of the Vodafone team handling 3G auctions in UK and Germany. He advised an EU National Regulatory Authority (NRA) on the structure and award of a 2nd mobile licence. He handled spectrum allocations for Etisalat’s successful bid for the 3rd Mobile Licence in Egypt in 2006 and served as a key advisor to the ITU Secretary General on spectrum and satellite related issues, including 4G. He also advised Solaris Mobile, one of two 2GHz pan European satellite licensees on the regulatory framework for that award and the award process.

Regarding the Digital Dividend he worked with ITU on spectrum issues ahead of relevant WRCs and also advised a number of clients in UK and EU on impact of the dividend in terms of spectrum availability for mobile and other services, including content and multimedia services.

Andy Haire structured and managed the spectrum policy and planning role for Singapore, including conducting allocation exercises (both, auctions and direct allocations), coordination (border coordination policy, major event assignments, and security), policy (new technological developments in the digital dividend reuse planning, new uses in UWB and higher frequency use) and the implementation of administrative pricing for many non-commercial users.

Faisal Ahmed’s work includes the assessment of White Space and Digital Dividend spectrum for a converged UK operator. He also has experience in spectrum issues canvassed in projects for new entrant in Nigeria, Indian 3G operator, Kazak Telecom, BskyB and UK Broadband.

Submarine cable access and commercial agreements

Ross Patterson reviewed competition issues with regard to submarine cable access in a GCC state.

Stewart White has advised on a range of submarine access and landing rights issues for companies such as STC in the UK and FLAG with regard to issues in Africa and the Middle East.

Andy Haire, as Singapore’s telecommunications regulator between 2000 and 2010, developed and implemented the framework that liberalised and provided access to international submarine capability in Singapore. By 2008, Singapore earned the top worldwide ranking of the most landed cable capacity.  These efforts included not only the economic and technical policy on the ‘wet side’ but policies within the landing station, and pricing issues related to backhaul into the nation’s communications networks.

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